13 Sep 2011

Lantern festival and mooncake festival..

here today i find my self writing about ...a cake ,,, and a day the lantern day ......
I been happy cose i cut a birthday cake with love ,,,, so any way ..... i am alone now watching people lighting in town the lantern ,, having a beer wih loga ......a nd eat moon cake ..

so here we go .. explanantion and picture of the story ....

The Mooncake Festival, also known as Lantern Festival, Festival of Reunions, Harvest Moon, or Mid-Autumn Festival, (Zhong Qiu Jie). The celebration is held every year, on the 13th day of the 8th month of the lunar calendar, when the moon is at its brightest.




, we use to produce almost the equivalent of 8 milion USD of this cake at year ,,,,, so u not gone ask why i like or i know about this.......... anyway when i first give first to my mum she almost chiok ... never mind here we go ,,.....

 so today is lantern day and the 13 day of the first day of chinese new year mean moon cake day festival

here some lantern picture i took around,,,,,,,,,,, i love it ................


The Lantern Festival (also known as the Yuanxiao Festival or Shangyuan Festival in China; Chap Goh Meh Festival in Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore; Yuen Siu Festival in Hong Kong, and "Tết Thượng Nguyên" or "Tết Nguyên Tiêu" in Vietnam); is a festival celebrated on the fifteenth day of the first month in the lunisolar year in the Chinese calendar, the last day of the lunisolar Chinese New Year celebration. It is not to be confused with the Mid-Autumn Festival, which is sometimes also known as the "Lantern Festival" in locations such as Singapore and Malaysia. During the Lantern Festival, children go out at night to temples carrying paper lanterns and solve riddles on the lanterns (simplified Chinese: 猜灯; traditional Chinese: 猜燈謎; pinyin: cāidēngmí). It officially ends the Chinese New Year celebrations.


Lantern in Malacca


China Town


Lanter in China Town


China Town


Thai Lantern On topop of  Kl Look out point




my favorite in malacca in front of a mortuary place ,......

moon cake here the picture .........................and what they are .......

Mooncakes are Chinese pastries with a thick tender skin, a dense filling, containing one or more whole salted egg yolks in their center to represent the moon. Traditionally, mooncakes bear a top imprint of Chinese characters that stand for “longevity’’ and “harmony.’’ The festival celebrated with merriment, dancing, feasts, moon-gazing. On the day of the festival, parents allow their children to stay up late to light their lanterns and watch the huge autumn moon rise while they partake of their mooncakes. Public parks light up with thousands of lanterns in all colors, sizes, and shapes.
Moon cake


There are various stories that tell of how the festival started, some of which can be traced as far back as the Tang dynasty in 618 A.D. One legend has it that a moon fairy once lived in a crystal palace and one day, 10 suns appeared simultaneously in the sky. The Emperor ordered an archer to shoot down the nine extra suns. When the task was accomplished, the Goddess of Western Heaven rewarded the archer with a pill that would make him immortal. However, his wife found the pill, took it, and was banished to the moon. It is believed that her beauty is at its fairest on the day of the Moon Festival.
But the most popular story has to do with Chinese history. It says that during the Yuan dynasty (A.D. 1280-1368), China was ruled by a Mongolian emperor. Leaders from the preceding Sung dynasty (A.D. 960-1280) were unhappy at submitting to his rule, and set out to organize a rebellion. As the Moon Festival was drawing near, the leaders of the rebellion ordered the making of special cakes; hidden in each mooncake was a message containing a plan for the attack. On the night of the Moon Festival, the rebels successfully attacked and overthrew the government.

well now days lot of new flavour and size tips of this cake ... enjjoy it if u have it ...

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